Because they could

A Cautionary Tale by Kurt Borne   They made fire, because they could. They realized the effects were good. But they never considered how exactly it was that they could. They were just happy that they could.   They learned to write and share ideas, because they could. They thought, “Since we can it must be good.” But they never stopped to consider the wonder of it all, just that they could.   They ruled over others, because they could. “We’re stronger than them, so for us it’s good.” But they never stopped to consider the danger, and whether they … Continue reading Because they could

Greg Hartle’s “Ten Dollars and a Laptop” Project

This gentleman’s career-life project speaks for itself, so I will not attempt to add to his amazing story. Greg calls it “An Epic Quest to Discover What It Takes to Succeed Starting From Scratch”…and it truly is. Learn all about Greg and his project here: “Ten Dollars and a Laptop“ Continue reading Greg Hartle’s “Ten Dollars and a Laptop” Project

Should You Bring Mom and Dad to the Office?

Employers Are Embracing the Involvement of Parents to Attract and Hold On to Talent By Anita Hofschneider September 11, 2013 Paul From was used to meeting the spouses and children of employees at company events. As chief executive of Central Wire Industries, a manufacturing firm based in Perth, Ontario, he has long held regular baseball games to get to know his employees better. But in the past five years, he has noticed his 20- and 30-something employees have started bringing new guests to company socials: Mom and Dad. Millennials—people born between 1981 and the early 2000s—are much closer to their parents … Continue reading Should You Bring Mom and Dad to the Office?

Brain, Interrupted

By Bob Sullivan and Hugh Thompson May 3, 2013 Technology has given us many gifts, among them dozens of new ways to grab our attention. It’s hard to talk to a friend without your phone buzzing at least once. Odds are high you will check your Twitter feed or Facebook wall while reading this article. Just try to type a memo at work without having an e-mail pop up that ruins your train of thought. But what constitutes distraction? Does the mere possibility that a phone call or e-mail will soon arrive drain your brain power? And does distraction matter — do … Continue reading Brain, Interrupted

The Ant And The Grasshopper

~ CLASSIC VERSION ~ The ant works hard in the withering heat all summer long, building his house and laying up supplies for the winter. The grasshopper thinks he’s a fool and laughs and dances and plays the summer away. Come winter, the ant is warm and well fed. The grasshopper has no food or shelter so he dies out in the cold. ~ MODERN VERSION ~ The ant works hard in the withering heat all summer long, building his house and laying up supplies for the winter. The grasshopper thinks he’s a fool and laughs and dances and plays … Continue reading The Ant And The Grasshopper

Resolving To Help Others See A Bigger Picture

I’m not typically one for New Year’s resolutions, but based on what I’ve been witnessing in the workplace, in my hometown, and in the media, I think I need to make one very serious resolution, at least in my work. I work in the training and development field, and I often serve as facilitator to newly hired employees in the workplace. I am seeing a disturbing trend in many Americans’ attitudes toward their work and career. The trend is that many employees’ focus is so narrow and limited that they do not allow themselves to see and plan for a bigger picture, a … Continue reading Resolving To Help Others See A Bigger Picture

The Vanishing Respect For Skilled Trades

One of cable television’s most recognizable characters, Mike Rowe knows a thing or two about jobs, particularly jobs involving skilled trades and manual labor. On his Dirty Jobs program on the Discovery Channel, Rowe learns and then performs hundreds of jobs that require getting down and dirty. If you haven’t seen the show, he opens every episode with this quote: “My name’s Mike Rowe, and this is my job. I explore the country looking for people who aren’t afraid to get dirty — hard-working men and women who earn an honest living doing the kinds of jobs that make civilized life possible … Continue reading The Vanishing Respect For Skilled Trades

Steve Jobs: How To Live Before You Die

If you haven’t seen it yet, “Steve Jobs’ 2005 commencement address at Stanford University” is definitely worth a look. Below are some of his memorable quotes on the subjects of connecting the dots of your life, loving your work, and living your own life. “You can’t connect the dots looking forward. You can only connect them looking backwards. You have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something. Your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. Because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow … Continue reading Steve Jobs: How To Live Before You Die

Early American View on Job Training

I am currently reading “The Americans – The National Experience” by Daniel Boorstin, Pulitzer Prize winner and former Librarian of Congress. The book is part of his trilogy on the social history of America. In his chapter on how innovative New England manufacturing methods were quickly putting American manufacturing ahead of old England, Boorstin wrote an interesting passage on the training of the American worker. Boorstin writes: The New England system of manufacturing, destined to become the American system, prized generalized intelligence, literacy, adaptability, and willingness to learn. As the machinery of production became larger, more complicated, more tightly integrated, more expensive, and more rigid, working men … Continue reading Early American View on Job Training

A Speech Every American High School Principal Should Give

I happened to run across this article recently, entitled “Speech Every American High School Principal Should Give.” I liked it so much, and agree with it so strongly, that I thought I’d share it with you this week. It speaks for itself. Enjoy! Continue reading A Speech Every American High School Principal Should Give

Today’s Wants vs. Needs ~ Maslow’s Hierarchy Today

“The story of the human race is the story of men and women selling themselves short.” ~ Abraham Maslow Many, many years ago in my early college days, I learned in at least one business and one psychology class about Abraham Maslow’s “A Theory of Human Motivation” and his “Hierarchy of Needs.” I was intrigued by the overall concept and I generally agreed with it then, and I still very much agree with it today. In fact Maslow’s Hierarchy has continually popped up in my brain over these many years as I observe human nature. In fact, I think our modern society … Continue reading Today’s Wants vs. Needs ~ Maslow’s Hierarchy Today

The Death of Ivan Ilyich

“Ivan Ilyich’s life had been most simple and most ordinary and therefore most terrible.” ~ Leo Tolstoy  Probably my favorite book of all time is “The Death of Ivan Ilyich” by Leo Tolstoy, published in 1886. I generally love all classic Russian literature, and I have read this one several times as it is a short “novella” of just about 130 pages. It is the story of Ivan Ilyich, who is a high court judge in the late 1800s. Ivan, who enjoys superior status in society, has fallen into what ironically many people today fall into, which is an addiction to … Continue reading The Death of Ivan Ilyich

Waiting For “Superman”

I just viewed the movie/documentary Waiting for Superman. It really did not tell me anything new that I didn’t already know, or at least suspect. More than anything it increased my disgust with the bureaucracy (administration and unions) of our education system. That being said, this film omits what I think is another very significant part of the problem – disengaged parents. “Waiting” makes it seem like all parents are awesome and engaged, and that everything that’s wrong with our education system is due solely to the “broken system.” I believe that, unfortunately, as much as we hear about disengaged teachers, there are just as many … Continue reading Waiting For “Superman”